Frequently Asked Questions

Who do CDFAs   help?

 

CDFA  professional's help clients determine the short-term and long-term financial impact of any proposed divorce settlement. They also provide valuable information on financial issues that are related to the divorce, such as tax consequences, dividing pension plans, continued health care coverage, stock option elections and much more. 

 

CDFA® professional's also help attorneys by helping the client make financial sense of proposals. CDFA® professional's give lawyers the tools they need to help prove their case.

 

Should a divorcing person hire a CDFA   instead of a lawyer? 

 

Definitely not! The IFDA™ highly recommends that any person getting a divorce seek legal counsel. The CDFA professional's role is to assist the lawyer - not to replace the lawyer.

 

Do CDFAs   help only men or only women? 

 

CDFAs  are trained to advocate for men and women. The CDFA   simply interprets the numbers and helps the lawyer build a strong case that's in the client's best interest.

 

Can CDFA  professional's act as a neutral party to help a couple reach a settlement? 

 

Many CDFA  professional's are also trained mediators or collaborative professionals who can take a role in facilitative mediation or collaborative divorce. However, most CDFA professional's are not also lawyers, and they cannot give legal advice. The IDFA™ always recommends that any person going through a divorce receive independent legal advice.

 

How a CDFA   helped one couple

 

John and Jane are 40 years old and have two children. They own a home worth $165,000 with net equity of $77,500. Their IRAs and 401(k) retirement plan total $165,500 in value. John earns $90,000 a year and has take-home pay of $68,760 a year. Jane has never worked outside the home and has no job skills, but she hopes to get a part time job for $8 an hour with take-home pay of $8,900 a year. 

 

The following settlement has been suggested. After the divorce, Jane and the children will live in the house which will be deeded to her. She will also receive $44,000 of the retirement moneys and John $121,500 thus, dividing the assets equally. John will pay Jane alimony of $600 per month for 5 years and child support of $225 per month per child. He will also pay college cost which start in 4 years. 

 

John's expenses include his normal living expenses, child support, alimony and college cost. Jane's expenses include support of the children and are, reduced when each child leaves home. This appears to be a reasonably fair settlement. However, an analysis creates the financial future illustrated in the following graph. Jane's assets will be completely depleted within seven years while John's investments will grow dramatically.

CHART BELOW IS BEFORE SETTLEMENT ADJUSTMENT

To improve Jane's financial future, the settlement could provide her with increased alimony of $1,500 per month for 10 years. This would actually cost John $1,005 per month in after-tax dollars.The correct child support according to the Child Support Guidelines is $1,125 per month for two children for a couple with their income. 

 

Jane also could be awarded an additional $24,300 from the retirement plans. She also may need to cut her expenses by 10%. These changes in the original settlement will produce the results illustrated in graph#2. 

 

John will still have a surplus which he can add to his investments. If John stays within his budget and invests all of his extra income, his investments have the capacity to grow to $2.5 million by the time he is age 60.

CHART BELOW IS AFTER SETTLEMENT ADJUSTMENT

This sample case illustrates the value of financial planning as a means of reaching more equitable divorce settlements. If the court's intent is to treat both parties in a divorce as equitably as possible, it is essential to analyze the marriage as if it were a financial contract, with tangible investment into it by both parties.

                                                                                                                                           source: https://www.institutedfa.com/how-cdfas-help/

For illustrative purposes only. Example created by Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts, is for illustrative purposes only. Results presented are hypothetical only, and are not based on any actual experience or result, so actual experiences may vary significantly. We cannot guarantee a particular outcome of any legal settlement or agreement. This information is not intended to be construed as tax or legal advice. Even though Certified Divorce Financial Analyst® professionals are aware of the law, they do not practice law and do not give legal advice.  

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Kimberly Surber is a Certified Financial Planner®  and a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst®; however such registration does not imply a certain level of skill or training and no inference to the contrary should be made. Information presented is for informational purposes only, does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any securities, and should not be considered investment advice.  Kimberly Surber has not taken into account the investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs of any individual investor. There is a risk of loss from an investment in securities, including the risk of loss of principal. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that any specific investment will be profitable or suitable for a particular investor's financial situation or risk tolerance. Asset allocation and portfolio diversification cannot assure or guarantee better performance and cannot eliminate the risk of investment losses. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial advisor and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed here. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Investments involve risk, including loss of principal and unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Information provided reflects Kimberly Surber's views as of certain time periods, such views are subject to change at any point without notice. For a copy of our Privacy Policy, see below.

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